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Hussain Abdul-Hussain

Hussain Abdul-Hussain is the Washington bureau chief of Kuwaiti daily Al-Rai and a former visiting fellow at Chatham House in London. Previously, he helped launch and manage the Iraqi stream of the Arabic TV network Alhurra. Before relocating to Washington, Abdul-Hussain worked as a reporter, and later as managing editor, for Lebanon’s The Daily Star. He has reported from conflict zones on the border between Lebanon and Israel, and from Baghdad shortly after the fall of the Saddam Hussein regime. Abdul-Hussain has also contributed articles to US newspapers, including The New York Times and the Washington Post, and appeared on American TV news networks such as CNN and MSNBC. In addition, he is a frequent commentator on Arabic satellite TV networks.

Articles By Hussain Abdul-Hussain

Lebanon’s Army Seeks Aid. It Doesn’t Deserve It Unless It Is Reformed By Hussain Abdul-Hussain - Oct 7, 2021

Lebanon is a country teetering on implosion, threatening the world with a flood of terrorism, narcotics and refugees. Besides everything else that ails the country – and there is plenty – it must now plead for donations for its army. You have to ask yourself, what kind of state asks for donations to pay its … Continue reading “Lebanon’s Army Seeks Aid. It Doesn’t Deserve It Unless It Is Reformed”

If Plans Work, Lebanon Will Get Gas from Egypt for Electricity. But It Will Be Syria that Wins By Hussain Abdul-Hussain - Sep 10, 2021

While parties in Lebanon and the government of Syria celebrated a plan for pumping Egyptian gas to Lebanon, depicting it as a victory against their imperial enemies, first and foremost America, the plan was in fact American, designed as a “crisis management” measure to help mitigate the effects of a free-falling Lebanon. Controlled by a … Continue reading “If Plans Work, Lebanon Will Get Gas from Egypt for Electricity. But It Will Be Syria that Wins”

The Roots of Lebanon’s Failure: It Votes, But Is Not a Democracy By Hussain Abdul-Hussain - Aug 11, 2021

Lebanon is a failed state. Everything that can go wrong, has. And then the country repeats every mistake one more time. From the near evaporation of the national currency, to the shrinking of its economy, to serial corruption scandals, it doesn’t take a genius to figure out that the wrong people are in charge. But … Continue reading “The Roots of Lebanon’s Failure: It Votes, But Is Not a Democracy”