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Joseph Dana

Joseph Dana is editor-in-chief of emerge85, a lab that explores change in emerging markets and its global impact. He was previously Monocle's Istanbul bureau chief, among other writing positions he has held in the Middle East. Dana's work has appeared in Le Monde Diplomatique, Bloomberg Businessweek, The Nation and GQ. His reporting and analysis focus on the collision of culture, urbanism, economics and politics. Dana has an MA in European history and philosophy from the Central European University in Budapest.

On this Nakba Day, Nonviolence Is All the Palestinians Have Left By Joseph Dana - May 13, 2018

On May 15, Palestinians will commemorate the 70th anniversary of their dispossession from their land when the state of Israel was created. Known as the Nakba or “catastrophe,” the somber anniversary is always marked by tension, and this year is no different. After 70 years of fragmentation, violence and dispossession, the Palestinian people find themselves … Continue reading “On this Nakba Day, Nonviolence Is All the Palestinians Have Left”

What the Plight of African Refugees in Israel Says About Zionism By Joseph Dana - Apr 19, 2018

With the growth of its technology sector and the discovery of large natural gas fields off its northern coast, Israel’s GDP has risen steadily in the last decade. Given its wealth and a relatively small population of 6 million, one would think Israel would have no problem absorbing African refugees fleeing persecution. After all, the … Continue reading “What the Plight of African Refugees in Israel Says About Zionism”

How Israel’s Military Courts Enable the Occupation to Flourish By Joseph Dana - Mar 29, 2018

Since Israel took over the West Bank and Gaza Strip in 1967, the country has obfuscated the exact nature of its regime in the Palestinian territories. In the early days of the occupation, Israel was racked by internal debate over whether to give back the captured territories in exchange for a peace agreement or annex … Continue reading “How Israel’s Military Courts Enable the Occupation to Flourish”